Pain in Medial Ankle

Eric H. Williams MD
Specializing in reconstructive surgery and pain relief in the Greater Baltimore area.

We are now two months from an interesting procedure on this gentleman’s leg. You can see the surgical incision here. This gentleman had pain in the medial ankle after an ankle join replacement. We think of having a joint replacement in the knee, but he had one in his ankle. And after the surgery, he was having pain associated with this area of his leg. And we felt that was due to the Saphenous Nerve that comes down here and might have been injured by a previous scar here.

So we blocked that nerve to sleep and his pain levels completely improved when we put that nerve to sleep several times. So we decided that we would go ahead an remove that. We’re now two months from that surgery, about a year and nine months, about a year and six months after the joint replacement, can you tell me how that went for you and what kind of improvement you’ve seen?

“The range of motion was really the most difficult because I couldn’t move my ankle at all and now I have a pretty good range of motion.”

And tell us why you weren’t able to move your ankle. Was it literally stiff, or was it painful?

“It was painful but also stiff from not moving it.”

Okay, and you’re two months from this surgery, how is your pain in that ankle, in the area that we tried to get rid of? How does that feel now?

“It’s pretty much gone.”

Gone? 90% gone?

“I would say 90% gone, yeah.”

Very good, and can you remind us, what was your pain level in that leg and ankle before the operation, and what is it now?

“Right in that area, it was a good 9 or 10. I couldn’t even move it.”

It was pretty severe then?

“Yes.”

It wasn’t like “ouch, this is uncomfortable,” this was incredibly painful.

“Yes, I locked it in place to keep from feeling it, it was so bad. And then after the operation,  it’s down to pretty much nothing.”

Great, and that has allowed you to have better range of motion because it doesn’t hurt when you move it?

“Correct.”

Alright, would you consider this successful?

“Definitely.”

Alright, any other problems or concerns that you had with the leg since we’ve operated on you?

“Not at all.”

Okay, thank you very much